The life and times of svante august arrhenius

Contact Author The Wright brothers' "Flyer" takes to the air, In the middle years of the s, the world was trembling on the brink of breakthroughs and breakdowns, and so was the no-longer-quite-young chemist, Svante Arrhenius.

The life and times of svante august arrhenius

Monday, 7 December Global Warming, Wind Farms and the Wild With the UN Climate Change Conference taking place in Copenhagen over the next two weeks the coverage of global warming in every type of media from blogs to newspapers is growing louder and more vociferous by the day.

On the surface there appears to be a debate going on as to whether global warming is taking place at all and if it is whether human beings are in any way responsible. However when you look at what the experts say, the scientists who have studied this for years, then the vast majority say the climate is warming and that human activity is at least partly responsible, which means we can do something about it by changing out activity.

All the major scientific organisations and societies worldwide are in agreement on this. The idea that all these different scientists and organisations could be part of some vast conspiracy to con the public into believing global warming was happening just seems ridiculous.

It has not been a happy journey. There used to be agreement between conservationists and environmentalists on almost everything. Enviromentalism now means global warming before everything. Groups like Friends of the Earth were hailing as a great victory for conservation the defeat of a proposed quarry on the island of Harris.

Now they are in favour of giant wind turbines stretching mile after mile in the same place. Anything that can be seen to do something to combat global warming, however miniscule, is justified to environmentalists regardless of any other damage it may do.

The idea of wilderness and nature having any value has gone. FOE founder David Brower, who spent much of his life fighting for wilderness protection and restoration, would be horrified to discover the group now favours industrialising wild places.

I used to support groups like FOE. I find it hard to do so now. And when an environmental activist like George Monbiot calls for wind turbines on top of every hill in Scotland I think people like him are enemies of wild places and therefore my enemies too.

Global warming threatens humanity as we live at present, in our ever burgeoning numbers, and the natural world as it exists now.

It does not threaten the planet or life in general. But it could wipe out many species and habitats as well as ruining our lifestyle. So I do think action needs to be taken. But that action must not also wipe out species and habitats. Environmentalists say that covering the hills in wind turbines, roads and power lines is necessary because otherwise the hills will suffer due to global warming.

No, this is not okay. The price for combating global warming cannot be the trashing of wild places. To do so would be to so diminish the world that it would not be worth saving anyway. If wild places, the environment we come from and depend on, cannot be saved then what can?

Wilderness, I truly believe, is essential to the human spirit. The lower Khumbu Glacier in Nepal. It is estimated that this glacier is shrinking by 20 metres a year.The first point, which deals with the origin of life on Earth, is known as panspermia — literally, "seeds everywhere." Its earliest recorded advocate was the Greek philosopher Anaxagoras, who influenced Socrates.

Jul 31,  · Svante Arrhenius's wiki: Svante August Arrhenius (19 February – 2 October ) was a Nobel-Prize winning Swedish scientist, originally a physicist, but often referred to as a chemist, and one of the founders of the science of physical chemistry. Arrhenius Acids. In the s, Swedish chemist Svante Arrhenius was busy studying the electrical properties of chemicals when put in water.

In his studies, he noticed that certain compounds. Svante August Arrhenius (/ ɑː ˈ r eɪ n i ʊ s /; 19 February – 2 October ) was a Nobel-Prize winning Swedish scientist, originally a physicist, but often referred to as a chemist, and one of the founders of the science of physical chemistry.

Svante August Arrhenius, the Swedish astronomer, who is now lecturing at Harvard, does not believe(like Prof. Percival Lowell, that the planet Mars is inhabited, although he admits that life not.

With the UN Climate Change Conference taking place in Copenhagen over the next two weeks the coverage of global warming in every type of media from blogs to newspapers is growing louder and more vociferous by the day.

The life and times of svante august arrhenius
Svante Arrhenius - Wikipedia